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> NBA History > New York Knicks History >


Patrick Ewing was born August 5th, 1962, in Kingston, Jamaica. He did not come to the United States until he was 12 years old. His family moved to Massachusetts in 1974 and the young Ewing began to watch the Boston Celtics. He went to Cambridge Ridge high school where he became a stand out center and was highly recruited.

Ewing decided to go to the University of Georgetown. While at Georgetown Ewing became a US citizen. His first year at Georgetown he lead the Hoyas to the nation championship game where they lost to the James Worthy lead North Carolina Tar Heels. Ewing once again lead the Hoyas back to the title game in 1984, this time they beat the Hakeem Olajuwon lead University of Houston. Having become a US citizen a few years before, Ewing was eligible to play for the United States Mens Olympic basketball team in the 1984 summer games in Los Angeles.

Ewing joined with fellow collage greats such as Michael Jordan, Charles Barkley, and Sam Perkins to lead the United States to the gold medal. The team was said to have had it easy since the Soviet Union boycotted the games in response to the 1980 boycott by the United States and its allies of the Moscow summer games. Ewing always disagreed with the sentiment that the Soviets would have proved to be quite a challenge to the ‘84 team, saying “The team is good, we can and will beat any body”-Ewing (SI 1984).

Ewing would return to Georgetown once again in 1985, and once again lead the Hoyas to the title game. The Hoyas would lose to Villanova, but Ewing solidified himself as the best player in college basketball. With the inaugural NBA lottery in 1985 Ewing was sure to be the prize to the winner. And as luck would have the winner would be the New York Knicks.

Ewing’s rookie year started out rocky as he was injured multiple times. But he did do well enough that he was named NBA rookie of the year, and helped the Knicks make the playoffs in 1986. Injuries would become a consistent thing thought-out most of Ewing’s career, especially the later seasons. Ewing finally played a full 82 games his third year in the NBA, and would go another 10 years before a series injury would make him miss more then 5 games a season.

By the onset of the 89-90 season Ewing was among the top centers in the NBA, and that season Ewing would average a career best 28 a game, and for the first time in his NBA career he averaged double digits in rebounds. This would start a 10 year pattern for Ewing of being a 20 points, 10 rebounds center. Ewing’s number so impressed the United States Olympic Committee that they once again added him to the United States Mens Olympic basketball team, in 1992, a team nicknamed “the Dream Team”.

After an embarrassing, and controversial loss in 1988 at the Seoul games, the United States was about to change how they operated their international basketball teams. They decided since the rest of the world sent professional athletes to the games, they should too. They chose some of the biggest names in the NBA to go and represent America, legends like Larry Bird and Magic Johnson, super-stars like Ewing, Michael Jordan, Clyde Drexler, Karl Malone, John Stockton, and Charles Barkely, and rising players Chris Mullin and Christian Laettner. The team was coached by Chuck Dailey who had just won two titles with the Detroit Pistons. The “Dream Team” went on to crush all of its opponents, despite losing both their point guards for much of the Barcelona games. Ewing’s numbers where around 8 points a game, but on a team with that much firepower Ewing wasn’t needed as a scorer, instead they relied on his defense more. Ewing held international stars Vlade Divac, and Arvydas Sabonis to less then 12 a game. The United States would once again capture the gold medal, and Ewing and his teammates where hailed as national heros.

Ewing would lead the Knicks to the NBA finals in 1994, and once again have to face off with Hakeem Olajuwon. But this time Ewing couldn’t beat Olajuwon like he did 10 years earlier in college. Hakeem Olajuwon and the Rockets would win the NBA title, which was a devastating blow to Ewing. The following season Ewing couldn’t get the Knicks back to the finals, as they lost to the Magic in the second round. This was the beginning of the End for Ewing, his numbers started to decline in 96-97, and the once dominate Knicks team would begin to break up.

Ewing looked to try and refurbish the Knicks in 97-98 with the addition of a few key role players, but 26 games into the season Ewing would blow out his knee and miss the rest of the year. This would mark the last time Ewing would average 20-10 in the NBA. The following year the Knicks brought in Lateral Sprewell, but the season was cut short by 32 games due to the NBA lockout. The Knicks struggled at first as Ewing played only sparingly. The Knicks made the playoffs as the 8th seed, and shocked the Miami Heat when they beat them in 5 games. The Knicks would once again find their way back to the NBA finals, but with no Ewing. Ewing hurt his knee in the semi-finals against Atlanta and would not be able to play. The loss of Ewing may have very well been the deciding factor as to why the Knicks lost the 99 finals, with no big man to clog the middle David Robinson and Tim Duncan did as they pleased and lead the Spurs to the title.

The 1999-2000 season would mark Ewing’s last as a member of the New York Knicks. Ewing would average 15 points, and was just shy of 10 rebounds a game. But he would miss 20 games due to injury and following the season was traded to the Seattle Sonics. Ewing would play in 79 of 82 games for the Sonics. He would also average just shy of 10 points and 8 rebounds. The following season Ewing went to the Orlando Magic. Ewing never quite fit in with the Magic, and only started 4 times, this was the only time in his entire career Ewing was not a starter. Following the 2001-02 season Ewing would retire for the NBA.

Ewing’s final career numbers are among the greatest in NBA history, for his career he averaged 21 points a game, 10 rebounds and a block a game. Ewing was a 9 time all-star with the Knicks, 3 times voted a starter. He was named one of the 50 greatest players in 1996, along with other great centers like Bill Walton, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, and Wilt Chamberlin.

Following his final year as a player in 01-02, Ewing joined the bench of the Washington Wizards who had just gotten the #1 pick Kwame Brown, and signed retired guard Michael Jordan. Ewing was to be a special assistant to Brown, but Brown was a head case and after the season Ewing joined the staff of the Houston Rockets who had also used the #1 pick to draft a center, Yao Ming. Unlike Brown, Ming has listened to Ewing and has improved in each of his three years. Ewing is still on the bench of the Rockets and hopes one day to become a head coach in the NBA.

Year Team GMs MPG FG%  FT%  3PT% RPG  APG SPG BPG PPG 
85-86 NYK 50 35.4 47.4 73.9  0.0  9.0 2.0 1.0 2.0 20.0 
86-87 NYK 63 35.0 50.3 71.3  0.0  8.8 1.7 1.4 2.3 21.5 
87-88 NYK 82 31.0 55.5 71.6  0.0  8.2 1.5 1.2 2.9 20.2 
88-89 NYK 80 36.2 56.7 74.6  0.0  9.3 2.4 1.5 3.5 22.7 
89-90 NYK 82 38.6 55.1 77.5 25.0 10.9 2.2 1.0 4.0 28.6 
90-91 NYK 81 38.3 51.4 74.5  0.0 11.2 3.0 1.0 3.2 26.6 
91-92 NYK 82 38.4 52.2 73.8 16.7 11.2 1.9 1.1 3.0 24.0 
92-93 NYK 81 37.1 50.3 71.9 14.3 12.1 1.9 0.9 2.0 24.2 
93-94 NYK 79 37.6 49.6 76.5 28.6 11.2 2.3 1.1 2.8 24.5 
94-95 NYK 79 37.0 50.3 75.0 28.6 11.0 2.7 0.9 2.0 23.9 
95-96 NYK 76 36.6 46.6 76.1 14.3 10.6 2.1 0.9 2.4 22.5 
96-97 NYK 78 37.0 48.8 75.4 22.2 10.7 2.0 0.9 2.4 22.4 
97-98 NYK 26 32.6 50.4 72.0  0.0 10.2 1.1 0.6 2.2 20.8 
98-99 NYK 38 34.2 43.5 70.6  0.0  9.9 1.1 0.8 2.6 17.3 
99-00 NYK 62 32.8 46.6 73.1  0.0  9.7 0.9 0.6 1.4 15.0 
00-01 SEA 79 26.7 43.0 68.5  0.0  7.4 1.2 0.7 1.1  9.6 
01-02 ORL 65 13.9 44.4 70.2  0.0  4.0 0.5 0.3 0.7  6.0 
CAREER   988 34.5 50.2 74.3 17.4 10.0 1.9 0.9 2.4 21.1 

Year Team G  Min  FGM-A    FTM-A   3PTM-A    REB AS     ST  BK  PTS 
85-86 NYK 50 1771 386-814  226-306    0-5    451 102     54 103  998 
86-87 NYK 63 2206 530-1053 296-415    0-7    555 104     89 147 1356 
87-88 NYK 82 2546 656-1183 341-476    0-3    676 125    104 245 1653 
88-89 NYK 80 2896 727-1282 361-484    0-6    740 188    117 281 1815 
89-90 NYK 82 3165 922-1673 502-648    1-4    893 182     78 327 2347 
90-91 NYK 81 3104 845-1645 464-623    0-5    905 244     80 258 2154 
91-92 NYK 82 3150 796-1525 377-511    1-6    921 156     88 245 1970 
92-93 NYK 81 3003 779-1550 400-556    1-7    980 151     74 161 1959 
93-94 NYK 79 2972 745-1503 445-582   4-14    885 179     90 217 1939 
94-95 NYK 79 2920 730-1452 420-560   6-21    867 212     68 159 1886 
95-96 NYK 76 2783 678-1456 351-461   4-28    806 160     68 184 1711 
96-97 NYK 78 2887 655-1342 439-582    2-9    834 156     69 189 1751 
97-98 NYK 26  848  203-403 134-186    0-2    265  28     16  58  540 
98-99 NYK 38 1300  247-568 163-231    0-2    377  43     30 100  657 
99-00 NYK 62 2035  361-775 207-283    0-2    604  58     36  84  929 
00-01 SEA 79 2107  294-684 172-251    0-2    585  92     53  91  760 
01-02 ORL 65  901  148-333  94-134    0-1    263  35     22  45  390 
CAREER 988 34071 8130-16191 4529-6092 19-109 9925 1884  889 2399 20808 


Written by:
Bran C. Faurschou