1966-Now

Chicago Bulls History

Player info
All-time Roster
Awards
Player Records
Team info
Expansion Draft
NBA Draft
Records by Season
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Michael Jordan

Quick facts:

Founded:                       April 30,1966     
Arena:                         United Center
Division Championships:        7
Midwest                        1(75)
Central                        7 (91,92,93,96,97,98,11)
NBA Titles:                    6 (91,92,93,96,97,98)
Best Record:                   72-10 (95-96)- Best Record in NBA History
Worst Record:                  15-67 (00-01)



Bulls getting started
The Chicago Bulls are the third NBA franchise in Chicago, after the Packers–Zephyrs (now the Washington Wizards) and the Stags (1946–50); the city of Chicago also has had two NBL franchises: The Chicago American Gears and the Chicago Bruis/Studebaker Flyers. The Bulls' founder, Dick Klein, was the Bulls' only owner to ever play professional basketball (for the Chicago American Gears). He served as the Bulls' president and general manager in their beginning years. The team started in the 1966 - 1967 NBA season, and posted the best record by an expansion team in NBA history. Coached by Chicagoan and former NBA star Johnny "Red" Kerr, and led by former NBA assist leader Guy Rodgers and forward Bob Boozer, the Bulls qualified for the playoffs, the only NBA team to do so in their first season.

How the Bulls got their Nickname:
Dick Klein wanted a name that evoked Chicago's traditional meat packing industry and the Chicago Stadium's proximity to the Union Stock Yards. Klein considered names like Matadors or Toreadors, but dismissed them, saying, "If you think about it, no team with as many as three syllables in its nickname has ever had much success except for the Montreal Canadiens."

The numbers of Michael Jordan:
Michael Jordan's #23 is about as iconic as a jersey number could be. Jordan wore the number through high school, into college and for most of his time as a member of the Chicago Bulls.

There are, however, two exceptions when Jordan did not wear his iconic #23 for the Bulls. The first occurred in 1990 in a game against the Orlando Magic. Jordan's #23 jersey was stolen from the locker room before the game, and with no time to replace it Jordan was forced to wear the alternate game jersey #12. There are few photographs of Jordan wearing the #12, though some can be found in our weird photo's gallery. The one except to this rule is that there is a NBA Hoops collector's card of Magic guard Sam Vicent where Jordan is shown. The card, though a common one, has become a sought after collectors item because Jordan wearing the #12.

The second time, and the more famous and longer tenured time, is when Jordan donned #45 for the Bulls following his first retirement. Jordan had to choose a new number because his #23 was retired by the Bulls. Jordan wore #45 through-out the 17 regular season games he played in 1995, and for 5 of the playoff games before switching back to #23.

The switch back to #23 caused issues with the NBA who fined the Bulls $10,000 every time Jordan did not wear #45; it ended up costing the Bulls $100,000 but the Bulls continued to allow Jordan to wear #23.

Arena:
United Center 
1994 - present 
Chicago Stadium 
1967 - 1994 
International Amphitheatre 
1966
Owner:
Jerry Reinsdorf 
1985 - present 
Bill Wirtz 
1983 - 1985 
Arthur Wirtz 
1972 - 1983 
Dick Klein 
1966 - 1972
Comparing the 15-16 Warriors and the 95-96 Bulls.

Every couple of decades a team comes along that is just magical. They are a team fans talk about for years after and what rising teams get compared to. The 1995-96 Bulls team was one of those, and this years Warriors team is another. In fact, this years Warriors team may be the team all future great teams get compared to.

The 95-96 Bulls went an astonishing 72-10 and were able to finish it up with a 69-13 campaign the next season and a 62-20 season the following year. In 3 season the Bulls won 203 of 246 regular season games. What is even more impressive is that during those same 3 years that Bulls team won 45 of 58 post season games and 3 NBA championships.

The Warriors have not yet had the time to accomplish this feat, so as it stands at this point in history the Bulls are still the watermark for what all other future dynasties are going to be compared.

Complete Article

The Teams: Bulls

Next to the Celtics and Lakers this team is next in the number of NBA championships, and it’s not the San Antonio Spurs; it’s the Chicago Bulls. The Bulls became the NBA’s first expansion team when they joined the NBA in 1966, the difference between an expansion team and the other teams is that the expansion teams fill out their roster from available players on the other NBA teams. prior to this any team which joined the NBA either already had their roster filled out since they joined from another league, or they signed players to play for them as in the case of the Zyphers. The Bulls used the first ever expansion pick on Jerry Sloan, who was taken from the Baltimore Bullets.

Sloan would become the teams first star. Sloan was never much of an offensive threat, as his career high in points per game was 18 in 1971. Sloan’s biggest asset to the team was his defense, was a four time all-first team defensive player including being on the first ever all defensive team.

Besides being the first expansion team, the Bulls are also the first and only NBA expansion team to make the playoffs. The Bulls did so in the 1967 playoffs, but would end up losing to the Hawks in three games. The Bulls would make the playoffs their second year, despite having a losing record for the second straight season. The Bulls would miss the playoffs their third year, but would return in 1970 but lose again to the Hawks.

Complete Article


United Center

Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, Bill Cartwright, BJ Armstrong, John Paxson, owner Jerry Reinsdorf, and coach Phil Jackson celebrate on the Bulls early 90s NBA championships.

Derrick Rose

Rookies Michael Jordan and John Stockton


Dennis Rodman, Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen would comprise the core of a Bulls team that would go 203-43 and win 3 NBA champions between 1995-1998

Artis Gilmore



Michael Jordan and Julius Erving go at it in 1984.

Michael Jordan wearing #45 after he came out of retirement in 1994.

 
NBA History

Jerry Sloan
Bulls History